Saturday, May 13, 2017

Pinches of Pixie Dust: 20 Things that Sparkle to use in Writing



Sometimes, a scene just needs some sparkle. When writing, we might often find ourselves searching for a sparkly something-or-other that will make a scene lively and bright. This list should help when searching for a glittering, sparkling word, so please use it in writing poetry, novels, and any other kind of writing. You might also take one word from the list and base a scene, freewriting session, or poem around it. As always, I hope the list helps you in your writing. Please don't hesitate to let me know how it goes or add to the list!


*** SPARKLE WORDS ***


  1. Diamonds
  2. Gold Coins
  3. City Lights
  4. Emerald City
  5. Sunlight
  6. Moonlight on Water
  7. Gems
  8. Crystals
  9. Eyes
  10. Dewy Grass in the Sun
  11. Glass
  12. Sequins
  13. Christmas Lights
  14. Fairies
  15. Glitter
  16. Ornaments
  17. Fireworks
  18. Nail Polish
  19. Gold Dust
  20. Raindrops on Leaves after a Sun Shower



Can you think of any other SPARKLE words? Please let me know in the comments!


Monday, May 8, 2017

The Fragrant Cauldron: Using Unique Scents in Writing—Part II









Finally! With the book launch of Back to Blueberry Pond, I haven't had much time to work on my writing blog. I've missed it! Here is Part II of my special blog series: The Fragrant Cauldron: Using Unique Scents in Writing. This portion will cover scents from D-I, so please check back for more scents to come as I wind down the alphabet! As always, comments are welcome! I hope this list and this series of scents to use in writing helps your own writing. Perhaps they will inspire a story or poem of their own!

D

Dew
Dandelions
Daisies
Dump
Dirt
Dill
Dog Food
Dollar
Dust
Donuts
Dead Bodies
Decay
Dungeon
Daffodil
Deodorant

E

Eggs
Eggplant
Embers
Eraser
Eggnog
Eucalyptus
Evergreens
Earth

F

Flowers
Fudge
Fried Onions
Farm
Fish
Fire
Fruit Punch
Fruit Stand
French Fries
Forest
Frosting
Fern
Frankincense

G

Geranium
Gum
Gymnasium
Gingerbread
Gas
Garbage
Garden
Gunpowder
Grass
Garlic
Grease
Glue
Grapes
Grape Lifesaver
Ginger
Ginger Ale
Graham Cracker
Grapefruit
Guava

H

Honey
Holly
Halibut
Hamburgers
Ham
Honeysuckle
Hay
Horses
Hobo
Hazelnut
Herbs
Honeydew Melon
Hot Chocolate
Hot Fudge
Halitosis

I

Ice
Ice Cream
Icing
Incense
Iris
Irish Cream

Don't forget to check out Part I of The Fragrant Cauldron series as well as my other posts on The Wizard of Writing Blog! Let me know if you think of any other scents from D-I!



Sunday, April 30, 2017

A Special Blog Entry: The Back to Blueberry Pond Secret Tupperware Bowl Giveaway










The Back to Blueberry Pond
Secret Tupperware Bowl Giveaway
“WHAT’S INSIDE??”

Enter to win a vintage yellow Tupperware bowl with surprise contents!

HUGE PRIZE PACKAGE INCLUDES:

  •  Vintage Yellow Tupperware Bowl
  • THREE SECRET items, tucked inside the bowl, that relate to the plot of BACK TO BLUEBERRY POND (these items best suited for a female)
  •  A signed print copy of BACK TO BLUEBERRY POND 
  •  Bookmarks
  •  Postcard Promos



Two Easy and Fun Ways to Enter!
(YOU DO NOT HAVE TO CHOOSE BOTH METHODS OF ENTRY!)

1. Sign up for my newsletter at www.carlatrueheart.com 
(One ticket will be entered in the drawing).


2. --OR-- Send me a few sentences -- no more than three -- through the CONTACT page at www.carlatrueheart.com Your prompt is: What one item would YOU have left behind from your teen years that you might have needed as an adult? Why? (Two tickets will be entered in the drawing). 



The Fine Print/Rules

1. You do NOT have to choose both entry methods. However, if you do, you will be entered THREE times in the drawing. 
2. If you win the prize, you will need to provide your mailing address. 
3. You are automatically entered once if you are already on my mailing list. 
4. Odds of winning depend on the number of entries received.
5. Winner will be chosen in a RANDOM drawing on May 30, 2017. 
6. Approximate retail value of prize package is $80
7. Winner will be announced in my email newsletter: Carla’s Quarterly (you will also receive an email announcing your win before this posts).
8. No entries allowed from author’s immediate family.
9. Item will be shipped with insurance and tracking. 
10. No purchase of any kind is required to enter the drawing.


GOOD LUCK!


Friday, March 31, 2017

The Fragrant Cauldron: Using Unique Scents in Writing—Part I

Some of my best memories as a reader would have to be the connections I made to a story through scents. Who could forget the Amortentia Potion in Harry Potter? The potion smelled differently depending on the person, and it was here that some love interests among the characters became evident. Because the sense of smell is so closely related to the part of our brains that hold memories, it is an important writing tool. Readers will feel something unique to them while reading about different scents. Maybe a reader has fond childhood memories of bubblegum. Maybe the scent of apple orchards sends them back to their grandmother's farm. Whatever the case, emotional connections are waiting to be made through scent.

Here is Part I of my list of scents to use in writing, A-C. Please check back soon for more, as I will continue this series of scents! I hope these inspire you, and you find ways to use them in your poetry and writing projects!




A
Almond
Amaretto
Autumn Leaves
Aftershave
Apples
Apple Pie
Anchovies
Ammonia
Apple Cider
Apricot
Ambrosia
Animal


B
Blueberries
Berries
Buttercream
Baked Goods
Bubblegum
Baby Powder
Barnyard
Basil
Bagels
Buns
Bread
Barbecue (BBQ)
Banana
Bubbles
Beer
Butter
Bacon
Blood
Blackberry
Brown Sugar
Butterscotch
Broccoli
Balsam


C
Christmas Wreath
Cinnamon
Carnations
Cookies
Car Exhaust
Candy Apple
Citrus
Candles
Cat Litter
Cake
Cupcake
Cheese
Chocolate
Coffee
Caramel
Candy
Cigarette Smoke
Cotton Candy
Cigar
Corn
Chalk
Coconut
Cranberry
Cherry
Camp Fire
Cedar
Carrot Cake
Cat Food
Candy Corn
Chicken
Cloves
Cough Syrup
Chlorine
Chinese Food
Cotton
Cucumber
Cantaloupe
Christmas Tree
Church
Candy Cane
Cheesecake
Citronella
Creamsicle
Chestnuts
Compost
Cappuccino
Cologne


What other scents can you think of from A-C that might be useful in writing? Let me know in the comments! 








Thursday, March 30, 2017

The Silky Cloak: 33 Textures to use in Writing



As writers, we're always looking to add sensory details to our projects. This pulls the reader further into the story and makes them part of the experience. Normally, we concentrate on what our characters see or hear, sometimes what they smell or even what they're eating. But one great use of sensory input that is often overlooked is the sense of touch through various textures. Writing about the soft smoothness of silk or the roughness of a brick wall has the ability to bring the reader right into the story through their own personal experience and senses. It can also make them feel pleasurable sensations or perhaps become repulsed by something unpleasant, such as a mouthful of dirt or sand.

Below, I've compiled a list of textures to use in writing. I hope you have fun with these and find ways to use them in your poetry, short stories, or book projects.


  1. Leather
  2. Velvet
  3. Wood
  4. Paper
  5. Glass
  6. Metal
  7. Linen
  8. Cotton
  9. Plastic
  10. Sponge
  11. Silk
  12. Lace
  13. Polished Stone
  14. Skin
  15. Dirt
  16. Sand
  17. Grass
  18. Marble
  19. Feathery
  20. Greasy
  21. Slippery
  22. Grainy
  23. Slimy
  24. Sharp
  25. Steel
  26. Concrete
  27. Fur
  28. Brick
  29. Cork
  30. Rubber
  31. Bumpy
  32. Flaky
  33. Powdery 
What other textures can you think of? Let me know in the comments!

Please check back tomorrow for my next Wizard of Writing blog post: The Fragrant Cauldron: Using Unique Scents in Writing—PART I













Friday, March 24, 2017

Sounds of the Moon: Using Music for Writing Inspiration




Throughout my life, music has been a soundtrack for special events and moments in time. It seems only fitting to apply my love of music to my love of writing and find inspiration through melody. Early on in my writing career, I found that music not only helped me when I was writing a manuscript draft or poetry, it also helped me away from my writing. Sitting on the couch, absorbed in a song through my headphones, my mind would form scenes and imagery. Characters ran during uptempo, they cried in downtempo. Plots sprung to mind listening to the voices of folk singers and their tales through song, and themes became apparent through soft new age music that let me reflect on my work. 

Some of my favorite music to write to is new age, so I’m providing a few of the albums that have aided me in the past and currently. While everyone has different tastes in music, some of these albums should inspire you as well, particularly if you write about magic or life quests as I do. Most of these albums have no words, as I feel that during the actual writing process it’s difficult to concentrate with words, but you might feel differently. Some people thrive when writing amongst noise or even with music blaring! If this is you, it might be useful to make playlists of your favorite albums or songs to write to. Songs can even inspire characters—edgy characters might fully form after listening to hard rock/alternative music for example. 

Without further ado, here is a list of albums that might be helpful to you as a writer. Listen while writing, or while away from writing, and I do hope these songs inspire you!

1. Medwyn Goodall
Always a favorite, Medwyn Goodall's music is ethereal and uplifting. Very good for writing magic.




2. Gary Stadler
These are some of my favorite albums to write to, especially when it comes to writing fantasy and magic genres. Some of my favorite albums are: Deep Within a Faerie Forest, Fairy Heart Magic, Fairy Lullabies, Fairy Nightsongs, and Fairy of the Woods.



3. Nox Arcana
For horror writers, you really can't do better than the music of Nox Arcana. Dark, mysterious, and gothic, Nox Arcana is the best out there for macabre writing music. 


So you like to write about witches. This is definitely one of the best new age albums as far as music with very little lyrics and witchy themes.


5. Llewellyn
If you follow my blog, you know I like colors. Colour Healing by Llewellyn covers every color of the rainbow through song. It's a fun album with no lyrics and it should inspire writing. 



6. David Arkenstone
Pretty much everything by David Arkenstone is perfect for background music while writing, although some songs do have lyrics. He has way too many albums to list here, but some of my favorites include Atlantis, The Fairy Garden, Loveren, and Snowfall. This music will definitely take you away to other worlds. 



7. Secret Garden
Many people are familiar with Secret Garden or have listened to them while growing up. These are beautiful and sometimes melancholy melodies that I guarantee will put you in another emotional state. 

8. Christopher Caouette
I had the pleasure of emailing with Christopher Caouette a few years back after writing about his music on my website. This is perfect music to write to if you're writing fantasy, dragons, or sword and sorcery books. 



9. 2002
Soft, moving music to have in the background when you don't want anything too obtrusive. 



10. Carolyn Fazio
I include this one for sentimental purposes. Enchanted World is the first new age music I remember writing to with my first manuscript, so many years ago. I barely remember it, except to say I had this fountain with lights that would turn different colors, and I used to run that in conjunction with this CD and write while everyone else in the world was out having fun in the summer. I don't think Carolyn Fazio has other CDs, but Enchanted World, to me, is a memorable classic. 




What are some of the songs and albums you listen to while writing? Let me know in the comments!



Tuesday, March 21, 2017

The Magician: Using Tarot Cards for Writing Inspiration



One element of writing that even advanced, professional writers often forget is the importance of freewriting. This would include sitting down for a few minutes before the real writing takes place and getting thoughts and impressions down as a warm-up exercise. In fact, it helps to think of freewriting that way: the warm-up exercise before we push ourselves into the heavy stuff.

In the past, I've tried freewriting with inspiration from boring household items I happened to spot around me, such as baskets or even apples. I would open a writing file and just start typing away about the color of the basket, the specific contents, or the sage green liner that was covered in a thin layer of dust. This approach helped, but one day I ran into freewriting inspiration in an unexpected place: my tarot card collection.

At a young age, I was exposed to new age elements, such as crystal balls and astrology. My mother is an astrologist, and I was always curious about how all of that worked. In my teen years, I learned how to do astrology and developed my own collection of new age items. Connecting my creative writing with tarot cards was unanticipated, but I'm so pleased that I did. There are so many ways to use these cards creatively, and even if you are not a new age fan, it might be a good idea to collect a few packs for writing inspiration. Here's what I mean.

From: The Gilded Tarot by C. Marchetti

Art as Inspiration. Tarot cards act as little pieces of art. The one pictured above from The Gilded Tarot is one of my favorites. Here, we get a miniature piece of artwork to use as inspiration. Just prop it up next to you and get going. You can freewrite about the white dove, the rainbow spilling out of (or into) the gold goblet, the fire, the ivy, or any combination of these elements. I think it might be fun to write a story about the entire card!


From: Ghost Tarot by D. Cozsi

Writing Prompts. Looking for story prompts to use for freewriting? Pulling out a random tarot card or going through the deck is useful. For example, look at the tarot card above from Ghost Tarot. What might the backstory be here? What happened or is going to happen between these two, a ghost and a non-ghost character? Is the ghost sad? Why does he seem to be escorting her?

From: Divine Circus Oracle by A. Fairchild

Characters. How about freewriting for character development? Look at all the faces, expressions, and hair colors here (Divine Circus Oracle). Look at the shape of the chin in the first card, the soft hair and dark eyes in the second card, the gothic look of the third card, and the uniqueness of the redhead in the fourth card. Characters on cards are awesome for freewriting, especially when we need more details in our character descriptions. This is one of my favorite freewriting exercises.

From: The Well Worn Path by R. Grimassi and S. Taylor
Outdoor Themes. Natural settings on tarot cards are useful as inspiration as well. Freewriting is especially fun when using a natural theme for poetry or just short musings. Look at the water and the rocks in the first card, the mountain and tree in the second card, the autumnal elements on the third card, and the harvest setting on the fourth card. There is much to write about here!

From: The Gothic Tarot by J. Vargo
Symbolism. Finally, another good way to get your mind thinking outside of the box through freewriting is with the symbolism found on many tarot cards. A quick, easy example is from a common card called The Star. A star can symbolize so much, such as a journey, hope, luck, a guiding light, or a bright new opportunity. Looking through the guidebooks that are included in many tarot card packs, I think you'll find that the tarot cards have specific meanings that might be used in writing. Also, the characters on the cards might be useful as archetypes in writing. The possibilities are endless.

I would highly recommend collecting tarot card packs, as they truly do inspire. As mentioned, even if you're not a new age type of person, the cards can serve as mini pieces of art, and many authors have been known to gain inspiration through artwork. Let me know how you make out with this journey, and if you need advice on card packs to acquire. I do have a vast collection!

Recommended Book: Tarot for Writers by Corrine Kenner
Recommended Website for Tarot Cards: Llewellyn http://www.llewellyn.com/browse_tarot_and_divination.php

Check back Friday for my next Wizard of Writing blog post: Sounds of the Moon: Using Music for Writing Inspiration